Injured by Transvaginal Mesh/Bladder Slings to treat Pelvic Organ Prolapse or Stress Urinary Incontinence?

July 30, 2012
Little Rock, AR Transvaginal Mesh and Bladder Sling Attorneys

Transvaginal Mesh and Pelvic Organ Prolapse & Stress Urinary IncontinenceThe Brad Hendricks Law Firm is investigating claims of severe complications associated with the use of transvaginal surgical mesh and bladder slings, which have been surgically installed to treat Pelvic Organ Prolapse (“POP”) and Stress Urinary Incontinence (“SUI”).

Pelvic Organ Prolapse occur when pelvic organs drop from their normal position because the tissues and muscles of the pelvic floor are no longer able to support the organs, which the uterus and bladder.  The muscles and tissue may become torn or weakened because of childbirth or age.  For several years surgical mesh has been used to treat POP and stress urinary incontinence.

Historically, surgical mesh has been used since the 1950s to repair abdominal hernias.  In the 1970s, gynecologists incorporated surgical mesh to treat POP.  Surgical mesh has been used to treat transvaginal POP and SUI since the 1990s.

In 2008, the United States Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) issued a Public Health Notification (“PHN”) to warn patients about adverse effects related to urogynecologic use of surgical mesh.  Between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010, 2,874 medical device reports (“MDR”) were submitted chronicling complaints of malfunction, injury and even death.  Of those reports, 1,503 were associated with POP, while 1,371 reports were associated with SUI repairs.  There were 3,979 reports of injury, death and malfunction between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2010.

Unfortunately, the FDA has reported, “[m]esh-associated complications are not rare.”  Approximately 10 of women undergoing transvaginal POP repair experience vaginal mesh erosion within 12 months of surgery.  Mesh contraction, which can cause vaginal shortening, tightening, or vaginal pain is increasingly reported by patients.  Some patients require numerous follow up procedures.

Common Complications from Surgeries that Insert Transvaginal Mesh and Bladder Slings

The most common complications associate with the use of transvaginal mesh and bladder slings include the following:

Mesh erosion through the vaginal tissue
Chronic vaginal drainage
Erosion of the vaginal tissue
Feeling as though something is protruding from the vagina
Lower back pain
Pain during intercourse and Vaginal Pain not related to intercourse
Perforations of the bowel, bladder or blood vessels
Pressure or feeling of “fullness” in the lower abdomen
Reoccurrence of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) or stress urinary incontinence (SUI)
Continued urinary problems
Vaginal bleeding
Vaginal infections
Vaginal pain not related to intercourse
Vaginal scarring

The Securities and Exchange Commission has reported that approximately 47,000 women have received pelvic mesh implants.  To date, more than 600 lawsuits have been filed against manufacturers.

Call Us if You or a Loved One has Been Injured by Transvaginal Mesh used to treat POP or SUI

The Brad Hendricks Law Firm wants to know if you or a loved one has been harmed by transvaginal mesh/bladder slings used to treat Pelvic Organ Prolapse and Stress Urinary Incontinence.  Call The Brad Hendricks Law Firm today at (501) 588-0549 or (866) 676-5096 for a free consultation with an experienced team of lawyers and professionals. If you or a loved one has been harmed by this urological or gynecological use of surgical mesh, you can count us to fight to make sure you are compensated for your injuries.

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Injured by Transvaginal Mesh/Bladder Slings to treat Pelvic Organ Prolapse or Stress Urinary Incontinence?

June 15, 2012
Little Rock, AR Transvaginal Mesh and Bladder Sling Attorneys

Transvaginal Mesh and Pelvic Organ Prolapse & Stress Urinary IncontinenceThe Brad Hendricks Law Firm is investigating claims of severe complications associated with the use of transvaginal surgical mesh and bladder slings, which have been surgically installed to treat Pelvic Organ Prolapse (“POP”) and Stress Urinary Incontinence (“SUI”). 

Pelvic Organ Prolapse occur when pelvic organs drop from their normal position because the tissues and muscles of the pelvic floor are no longer able to support the organs, which the uterus and bladder.  The muscles and tissue may become torn or weakened because of childbirth or age.  For several years surgical mesh has been used to treat POP and stress urinary incontinence. 

Historically, surgical mesh has been used since the 1950s to repair abdominal hernias.  In the 1970s, gynecologists incorporated surgical mesh to treat POP.  Surgical mesh has been used to treat transvaginal POP and SUI since the 1990s.

In 2008, the United States Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) issued a Public Health Notification (“PHN”) to warn patients about adverse effects related to urogynecologic use of surgical mesh.  Between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010, 2,874 medical device reports (“MDR”) were submitted chronicling complaints of malfunction, injury and even death.  Of those reports, 1,503 were associated with POP, while 1,371 reports were associated with SUI repairs.  There were 3,979 reports of injury, death and malfunction between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2010.

Unfortunately, the FDA has reported, “[m]esh-associated complications are not rare.”  Approximately 10 of women undergoing transvaginal POP repair experience vaginal mesh erosion within 12 months of surgery.  Mesh contraction, which can cause vaginal shortening, tightening, or vaginal pain is increasingly reported by patients.  Some patients require numerous follow up procedures.

Common Complications from Surgeries that Insert Transvaginal Mesh and Bladder Slings

The most common complications associate with the use of transvaginal mesh and bladder slings include the following:

Mesh erosion through the vaginal tissue
Chronic vaginal drainage
Erosion of the vaginal tissue
Feeling as though something is protruding from the vagina
Lower back pain
Pain during intercourse and Vaginal Pain not related to intercourse
Perforations of the bowel, bladder or blood vessels
Pressure or feeling of “fullness” in the lower abdomen
Reoccurrence of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) or stress urinary incontinence (SUI)
Continued urinary problems
Vaginal bleeding
Vaginal infections
Vaginal pain not related to intercourse
Vaginal scarring

The Securities and Exchange Commission has reported that approximately 47,000 women have received pelvic mesh implants.  To date, more than 600 lawsuits have been filed against manufacturers.

Call Us if You or a Loved One has Been Injured by Transvaginal Mesh used to treat POP or SUI

The Brad Hendricks Law Firm wants to know if you or a loved one has been harmed by transvaginal mesh/bladder slings used to treat Pelvic Organ Prolapse & Stress Urinary Incontinence.  Call The Brad Hendricks Law Firm today at (501) 588-0549 or (866) 676-5096 for a free consultation with an experienced team of lawyers and professionals. If you or a loved one has been harmed by this urological or gynecological use of surgical mesh, you can count us to fight to make sure you are compensated for your injuries.


FDA Approved Pradaxa Linked to Fatal Bleeds

June 15, 2012

Arkansas Pradaxa Lawyers in Little Rock - Brad Hendricks Law Firm

If you or a loved one has taken Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate mesylate), an anticoagulant or blood thinning medication used to reduce the risk of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF), and have suffered dangerous, life-threatening side effects such as internal bleeding or hemorrhaging, heart attack or myocardial infarction (MI), please call The Brad Hendricks Law Firm.

Pradaxa Approved by FDA in 2010 and Investigated by 2011

In 2010, the United States Food & Drug Administration (FDA) approved Pradaxa, manufactured by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., as a direct thrombin inhibitor indicated to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Its popularity soon increased due to the perception that it was easier to use and modify than warfarin, with fewer interactions.

An investigation was launched less than one year later, in September 2011, after five New Zealand patients died from internal bleeding/hemorrhaging after taking Pradaxa. Mere weeks earlier, Japanese officials had notified the manufacturer that 81 elderly patients experienced heavy bleeding/hemorrhaging from March 14 to August 11, during which time five patients died. In the United States, the FDA received approximately 3,781 adverse event reports identifying Pradaxa use in 2011 alone-more than reports associated with any other drug monitored by the FDA.

No Known Antidote for Pradaxa-Related Bleeding

The FDA announced in January 2012 that it had approved changes to the Warning and Precautions section of Pradaxa’s labeling to include the following: "Lack of a specific reversal agent; futility of using vitamin K to affect anticoagulant effect." There is no specific agent known to aid with the reversal of Pradaxa related bleeding. Vitamin K, a known antidote used to counter warfarin-related bleeding, is ineffective. The new labels also warned that Pradaxa’s anticoagulant activity and half-life are increased in patients with renal (kidney) impairment. Pradaxa was hailed as a safer alternative to traditional blood thinners like warfarin; however, warfarin bleeding may be interrupted by administering Vitamin K. Because Vitamin K is not effective to interrupt Pradaxa bleeding, the effects can be deadly. Risks increase with age, according to some reports.

Pradaxa Bleeds May be Fatal - Brad Hendricks Law Firm Although anticoagulants are known to carry some risk of bleeding, patients who have taken Pradaxa have reported potentially harmful symptoms such as:

Unusual bleeding/hemorrhaging or bruising
Unusual gum bleeding or frequent nose bleeds
Heavier-than-normal menstrual or vaginal bleeding
Uncontrolled bleeding
Pink or brown urine or red or black (tar-like) stools
Unexplained bruising or bruising that gets larger
Coughing up blood or blood clots
Vomiting blood, or vomiting a substance resembling coffee grounds
Dizziness
Lethargy
Weakness or swelling of the feet, ankles, lower legs, hands, and feet or other joint pain or swelling

The FDA cautions that those taking Pradaxa should not stop taking the medication without first consulting a trained healthcare professional, as sudden cessation of this medication may increase the risk of stroke. If you or a loved one are taking or have taken Pradaxa, and have observed or developed any symptom identified above, please contact your healthcare provider immediately. Ask your healthcare professional whether Pradaxa could be the cause of the problem.

Pradaxa Injury Help You Can Count On

We want to know about your experience with this dangerous drug whose use may lead to fatal internal bleeding or hemorrhaging. Call The Brad Hendricks Law Firm today at (501) 588-0549 or (866) 676-5096 for a free consultation with an experienced team of lawyers and professionals. If you or a loved one has been harmed by Pradaxa, you can count us to fight to make sure you are compensated for your injuries.


Arkansas is the least Bicycle-Friendly State

May 24, 2012

Bicycle AccidentIn honor of National Bike Month, the League of American Bicyclists released its Bicycle Friendly States Ranking on May 22, 2012.  Arkansas is ranked as the 50th Bicycle Friendly States – last, in other words.

The rankings were based on an examination and comparison of the states in five (5) categories:  Legislation and Enforcement, Policies and Programs, Infrastructures and Funding, Education and Encouragement, and Evaluation and Planning.  While Arkansas received a score of “2” in the “Legislation and Enforcement,” in part due to its safe passing law, the lowest score of “1” was assigned in all other categories.

Arkansas’s high rate of fatalities in proportion to the number of bicyclists is cited as one reason for its poor ranking.  The League recommended bicycle safety as an emphasis for all projects, programs, and policies.  The top suggestion for Arkansas was that it adopt a state bicycle plan and establish a bicycle advisory committee to oversee the plan. 

Others suggestions included:

•     Develop a Police Officer Standards and Training (POST) curriculum for bicycling enforcement both for new officers and continuing education – focus on laws related to bicyclists, interactions between motorists and bicyclists, and bicycle collision investigation.

•     Adopt a statewide Complete Streets policy.  The National Complete Streets Coalition has a model state policy and other resources to ensure adoption and implementation.

•     Adopt federal funding project rating criteria that incentivize bicycle projects and accommodations. The state is spending a low amount, less than 0.56 percent, of federal funding on bicyclists and pedestrians.

•     Conduct a share the road campaign creatively addressing the issues specific to your state.

•     In general, any question that was answered with “no” should be addressed so the answer can be a “yes” next year.

Source: Today’s THV and The League of American Bicyclists

This post is brought to you from The Brad Hendricks Law Firm as a service to provide legal and other information of public interest. If you have any questions about this or any other post, please contact our firm at (501) 221-0444 or (800) 603-5100 or email us. Our firm provides legal counsel in the areas of Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice, Social Security, Bankruptcy, Business Law, Employment Law, and Family Law, among others.


ReBlog: Child Booster Seats Warning

May 18, 2012

Half of the children’s car booster seats on the market don’t fit properly with seat belts, according to an insurance industry safety group.  The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety says it’s important that booster seats raise children up so adult-sized seat belts fit properly.

Click here to watch a video about proper child booster seat use.

View Article

Source:  Arkansas Matters & Newsroom Solutions

This post is brought to you from The Brad Hendricks Law Firm as a service to provide legal and other information that may be of interest to Arkansans, our clients, and visitors. If you have any questions about this or any other post, please contact our firm at (501) 221-0444 or (800) 603-5100 or email us. Our firm provides legal counsel in the areas of Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice, Social Security, Bankruptcy, Business Law, Employment Law, and Family Law, among others.


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